de en

Speculative Triggers: S.O.S. Chairs

Off of Mexico Platz, up Argentinische Allee.  Zehlendorf, Berlin is a part of town that takes you back in time.

Old villas in spring. Mothers pushing designer prams a la 1920s—shiny steel and blue sunroof. Mom-andpop shop style—Tante Emma Laden—sausage, fruit, and vegetable market and kiosk welcome you at the S-Bahn.

The Haus am Waldsee* is an esteemed cultural institution with a history of trading hands. Originally acquired by a German-Jewish entrepreneur—a Mister Knobloch—and sold in 1926, the villa was taken over during National Socialism. In post-war Germany, the Jewish Restitution Successor Organization inquired about reparations, receiving documentation of the prewar sale. Now, the district has declared the house German cultural heritage. Fancy caramel cake and frothy coffee are to be had and framed proof and praise of great men (Picasso, Henry Moore, Max Ernst) hang on the cafe walls. A new normal.

Currently on view at the Haus am Waldsee, the notorious industrial designer and international superstar Konstantin Grcic comments on how design and New Normals intertwine. His first solo institutional show in Berlin, the exhibition consists of futuristic environments, reoccurring classics such as the Mayday (1999) lamp meet upon new furniture scenarios. In pastel and neon tones and quirky material pairings, each scenario opens up a world of speculation. The new normals of each environment are numbered, and the Mayday lamp appears in every room. Enter the futuristic playground.

MAYDAY?

The Mayday lamp was one of Grcic’s first commercially successful projects. It hangs like a fire extinguisher in every room. Like a gumball machine on the street to interact with. Here, to reflect, alarm, and shed some light on this critical moment in our times. A red neon element that ruptures the smooth, sleek designer surfaces. It is a functional leitmotif. Its versatile attributes are what garnered its popularity. Handle. Hook. The lamp is a tool and redefines the typology of a lamp, named after the emergency call for alarm when the Titanic sank. MAYDAY—when you are in trouble. Entitled Normal 0 within the exhibition, its presence calls out in every room: “M’aider”. Save our souls.

Normal 1-14
Though not explicitly about Covid, it is impossible to view these works of furniture without seeing them in the context of the pandemic and social distancing. Beautifully industrially designed chairs are a reoccurring structure on this exhibition route. Meant for use every day, but thanks to some futuristic disaster, these chairs seem blocked. The friction manifests in chained chairs. Chained up with neon orange bike locks, bound with gymnastic straps. Chairs with television and radio satellites, chairs hanging from the ceiling, chairs as benches, tables without chairs. Stools in group formations. From these chairs in our home offices, we change the world. Swiping, posting?

“Do not sit or touch the designer chairs”, the house advises. The tension of not being able to interact with these social formations is palpable.

In comparison, the Haus am Waldsee offers viewers a chair in the corner of each room to sit on, and imagine sitting on the Grcic’s chair scenario. Now, this might seem somewhat cruel at first glance, but this is when the imagination begins to play tricks on you. The players who should be resting on these seats are ghosts in this furniture land. It is like downloading a hallucination.
Case in point, Normal 15 is made of surveillance LEDs, cables slithering towards and hooking up like rattlesnakes to a center stone. Red stools with little trays to catch something and to commune around the center stone. Silent and immobile, animism is projected onto the site. Is this a challenge out of the Squid Game—the Korean sci-fi Netflix show that got us through the pandemic? Dare to play and perhaps riches await, lose the game—well—die.

The architecture of the house converses with the chairs and the tiling and hardwood floors. You cannot look out of the milky glass windows. This removes the experience from our sense of time and place. Whose living room is this? Who sits or will sit on these chairs? Do we want to sit on these chairs? Are we jealous of whoever gets to sit on these chairs?
Have you settled for this new normal? Have you gotten used to this status quo? Are you used to this lifestyle? Is this comfortable? Or, is this all we know? Is this the new domestic life? Is this a dystopian or utopian sci-fi soap opera?

These chairs set standards.

Normal 5 — Champions Table
Does high society come together at this table? Judy Chicago dinner of mirrors?
Always keep your neighbour in your side-view mirror.
Sleek glass table. Society flexes its respectability and reflecting capabilities.
No chairs. Can everyone stand at the bar?

Normal 10
—It’s not spinning, but it looks like it should.
360-degree chairs. Dead or alive? You spin me right round baby, like a record baby right round, round, round. A blinking light underlines the sense of uneasiness. Are we spinning into a new future of digital and industrial possibilities?

MAYDAY …

Normal 14
A fleshy-looking pink Yoga ball, trapped in between two plushy sofas pushed together, a net hangs from the ceiling. Yoga balls are like a meme for neoliberalism:
Breathe in and relax, now, work harder!
The environment is like a deconstructed ball pit, with one big ball.
Out of all of the seating arrangements, this sensual installation could be perhaps the bedroom in this nonhouse am Waldsee. What types of play happen on these crimson cushions? Is it a trap, cage, or pleasurable haven? The world is your oyster after all … unless catastrophe strikes, your privileges are lost.

Normal 12
Golden upholstered dentist-like lounge chair. Phone holders all around. Is this an influencer’s dream or a torture device? Gen Z TikTok stars, schooling the world from the comfort of their lounge chairs. There is even a little side-board built-in for a glass—perhaps a protein shake. This lounging device is cold and rich, like most things connected to our phones. Somehow luxurious and mean. We live in inspiring and terrifying times. Digitization is understood as forward-thinking. Digital and technological platforms afford extraordinary immediate ways of sharing, producing, uploading, exchanging, communicating. On the other hand, totalitarian forms of assembly, pay-walling, data collection, and discriminating surveillance challenge our user safety.

MAY DAY!

Grcic’s work has become renowned for its aesthetic minimalism and multifunctional features. There is a certain ambiguity to each case study he sets up. This makes them indefinite spaces for projection. Aesthetic, certainly … dangerous normals, perhaps … It seems time has come to a stand-still in the exhibition space. The modular items connote flexibility, keeping an open mind both materially and relationally despite irritation. Visitor’s feedback in the guestbook shows that the imagination is activated with propositions for more chairs such as The Whiskey Sour Chair, The Love-Making Chair, The Spider Chair.

How did we get here, to this new normal? Are these singular episodes? Proof that there are continuities? A call to get up off of your chair. A silent state of alarm. Did we miss the warning signs? Grcic depicts experiments in an insecure future: speculative triggers for world-making.

This text was first published in Lerchenfeld No. 61.

Nina Prader, born in Washington D.C., is an artist, writer, curator and independent publisher between Berlin and Vienna. She runs Lady Liberty Library and Showroom. The work Soft Construction by Valentina Karga (Professor of Design at the HFBK Hamburg) and Mascha Fehse is currently on view there.

Renée Green. ED/HF, 2017. Film still. Courtesy of the artist, Free Agent Media, Bortolami Gallery, New York, and Galerie Nagel Draxler, Berlin/Cologne/Munich.

Renée Green. ED/HF, 2017. Film still. Courtesy of the artist, Free Agent Media, Bortolami Gallery, New York, and Galerie Nagel Draxler, Berlin/Cologne/Munich.

Finkenwerder Kunstpreis 2022

Der 1999 vom Kulturkreis Finkenwerder e.V. initiierte Finkenwerder Kunstpreis hat eine Neuausrichtung erfahren: Als neuer Partner erweitert die HFBK Hamburg den Preis um den Aspekt der künstlerischen Nachwuchsförderung und richtet ab 2022 die Ausstellung der Prämierten in der HFBK Galerie aus. Mit dem diesjährigen Finkenwerder Kunstpreis wird die US-amerikanische Künstlein Renée Green ausgezeichnet. Die HFBK-Absolventin Frieda Toranzo Jaeger erhält den Finkenwerder Förderpreis der HFBK Hamburg.

Amanda F. Koch-Nielsen, Motherslugger; Foto: Lukas Engelhardt

Amanda F. Koch-Nielsen, Motherslugger; Foto: Lukas Engelhardt

Nachhaltigkeit im Kontext von Kunst und Kunsthochschule

Im Bewusstsein einer ausstehenden fundamentalen gesellschaftlichen Transformation und der nicht unwesentlichen Schrittmacherfunktion, die einem Ort der künstlerischen Forschung und Produktion hierbei womöglich zukommt, hat sich die HFBK Hamburg auf den Weg gemacht, das Thema strategisch wie konkret pragmatisch für die Hochschule zu entwickeln. Denn wer, wenn nicht die Künstler*innen sind in ihrer täglichen Arbeit damit befasst, das Gegebene zu hinterfragen, genau hinzuschauen, neue Möglichkeiten, wie die Welt sein könnte, zu erkennen und durchzuspielen, einem anderen Wissen Gestalt zu geben

Atelier-Neubau in der Häuserflucht am Lerchenfeld

Atelier-Neubau in der Häuserflucht am Lerchenfeld, im Hintergrund der Bau von Fritz Schumacher; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Raum für die Kunst

Nach mehr als 40 Jahren intensiven Bemühens wird für die HFBK Hamburg ein lang gehegter Traum Wirklichkeit. Mit dem neu eröffneten Ateliergebäude erhalten die Studienschwerpunkte Malerei/Zeichnen, Bildhauerei und Zeitbezogene Medien endlich die dringend benötigten Atelierräume für Master-Studierende. Es braucht einfach Raum für eigene Ideen, zum Denken, für Kunstproduktion, Ausstellungen und als Depot.

Martha Szymkowiak / Emilia Bongilaj, Installation “Mmh”; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Martha Szymkowiak / Emilia Bongilaj, Installation “Mmh”; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Jahresausstellung 2022 an der HFBK Hamburg

Nach der digitalen Ausgabe im letzten Jahr, findet die Jahresausstellung 2022 an der HFBK Hamburg wieder mit Publikum statt. Vom 11.-13. Februar präsentieren die Studierenden aus allen Studienschwerpunkten ihre künstlerischen Arbeiten im Gebäude am Lerchenfeld, in der Wartenau 15 und im neu eröffneten Atelierhaus.

Annette Wehrmann, photography from the series Blumensprengungen, 1991-95; Foto: Ort des Gegen e.V., VG-Bild Kunst Bonn

Annette Wehrmann, photography from the series Blumensprengungen, 1991-95; Foto: Ort des Gegen e.V., VG-Bild Kunst Bonn

Conference: Counter-Monuments and Para-Monuments

The international conference at HFBK Hamburg on December 2-4, 2021 – jointly conceived by Nora Sternfeld and Michaela Melián –, is dedicated to the history of artistic counter-monuments and forms of protest, discusses aesthetics of memory and historical manifestations in public space, and asks about para-monuments for the present.

23 Fragen des Institutional Questionaire, grafisch umgesetzt von Ran Altamirano auf den Türgläsern der HFBK Hamburg zur Jahresausstellung 2021; Foto: Charlotte Spiegelfeld

23 Fragen des Institutional Questionaire, grafisch umgesetzt von Ran Altamirano auf den Türgläsern der HFBK Hamburg zur Jahresausstellung 2021; Foto: Charlotte Spiegelfeld

Diversity

Wer spricht? Wer malt welches Motiv? Wer wird gezeigt, wer nicht? Identitätspolitische Fragen spielen in der Kunst und damit auch an der HFBK Hamburg eine wichtige Rolle. Das hochschuleigene Lerchenfeld-Magazin beleuchtet in der aktuellen Ausgabe Hochschulstrukturen sowie Studierendeninitiativen, die sich mit Diversität und Identität befassen.

Grafik: Tim Ballaschke

Grafik: Tim Ballaschke

Semesterstart

Nach drei Semestern Hybrid-Lehre unter Pandemiebedingungen steht nun endlich wieder ein Präsenz-Semester bevor. Wir begrüßen alle neuen Studierenden und Lehrenden an der HFBK Hamburg und laden herzlich zur Eröffnung des akademischen Jahres 2020/21 ein, die in diesem Jahr von einem Gastvortrag von ruangrupa begleitet wird.

Grafik: Sam Kim, Bild im Hintergrund: Sofia Mascate, Foto: Marie-Theres Böhmker

Grafik: Sam Kim, Bild im Hintergrund: Sofia Mascate, Foto: Marie-Theres Böhmker

Graduate Show 2021: All Good Things Come to an End

Vom 24. bis 26. September präsentierten die mehr als 150 Bachelor- und Master-Absolvent*innen des Jahrgangs 2020/21 ihre Abschlussarbeiten im Rahmen der Graduate Show in der HFBK Hamburg. Wir bedanken uns bei allen Besucher*innen und Beteiligten.

Foto: Klaus Frahm

Foto: Klaus Frahm

Summer Break

Die HFBK Hamburg befindet sich in der vorlesungsfreien Zeit, viele Studierende und Lehrende sind im Sommerurlaub, Kunstinstitutionen haben Sommerpause. Eine gute Gelegenheit zum vielfältigen Nach-Lesen und -Sehen:

ASA Open Studio 2019, Karolinenstraße 2a, Haus 5; Foto: Matthew Muir

ASA Open Studio 2019, Karolinenstraße 2a, Haus 5; Foto: Matthew Muir

Live und in Farbe: die ASA Open Studios im Juni 2021

Seit 2010 organisiert die HFBK das internationale Austauschprogramm Art School Alliance. Es ermöglicht HFBK-Studierenden ein Auslandssemester an renommierten Partnerhochschulen und lädt vice versa internationale Kunststudierende an die HFBK ein. Zum Ende ihres Hamburg-Aufenthalts stellen die Studierenden in den Open Studios in der Karolinenstraße aus, die nun auch wieder für das kunstinteressierte Publikum geöffnet sind.

Studiengruppe Prof. Dr. Anja Steidinger, Was animiert uns?, 2021, Mediathek der HFBK Hamburg, Filmstill

Studiengruppe Prof. Dr. Anja Steidinger, Was animiert uns?, 2021, Mediathek der HFBK Hamburg, Filmstill

Vermitteln und Verlernen: Wartenau Versammlungen

Die Kunstpädagogik Professorinnen Nora Sternfeld und Anja Steidinger haben das Format „Wartenau Versammlungen“ initiiert. Es oszilliert zwischen Kunst, Bildung, Forschung und Aktivismus. Ergänzend zu diesem offenen Handlungsraum gibt es nun auch eine eigene Website, die die Diskurse, Gespräche und Veranstaltungen begleitet.

Ausstellungsansicht "Schule der Folgenlosigkeit. Übungen für ein anderes Leben" im Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg; Foto: Maximilian Schwarzmann

Ausstellungsansicht "Schule der Folgenlosigkeit. Übungen für ein anderes Leben" im Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg; Foto: Maximilian Schwarzmann

Schule der Folgenlosigkeit

Alle reden über Folgen: Die Folgen des Klimawandels, der Corona-Pandemie oder der Digitalisierung. Friedrich von Borries (Professor für Designtheorie) dagegen widmet sich der Folgenlosigkeit. In der "Schule der Folgenlosigkeit. Übungen für ein anderes Leben" im Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg verknüpft er Sammlungsobjekte mit einem eigens für die Ausstellung eingerichteten „Selbstlernraum“ so, dass eine neue Perspektive auf „Nachhaltigkeit“ entsteht und vermeintlich allgemeingültige Vorstellungen eines „richtigen Lebens“ hinterfragt werden.

Jahresausstellung 2021 der HFBK Hamburg

Jahresausstellung einmal anders: Vom 12.-14. Februar 2021 hatten die Studierenden der Hochschule für bildende Künste Hamburg dafür gemeinsam mit ihren Professor*innen eine Vielzahl von Präsentationsmöglichkeiten auf unterschiedlichen Kommunikationskanälen erschlossen. Die Formate reichten von gestreamten Live-Performances über Videoprogramme, Radiosendungen, eine Telefonhotline, Online-Konferenzen bis hin zu einem Webshop für Editionen. Darüber hinaus waren vereinzelte Interventionen im Außenraum der HFBK und in der Stadt zu entdecken.

Studieninformationstag 2021

Wie werde ich Kunststudent*in? Wie funktioniert das Bewerbungsverfahren? Kann ich an der HFBK auch auf Lehramt studieren? Diese und weitere Fragen rund um das Kunststudium beantworteten Professor*innen, Studierende und Mitarbeiter*innen der HFBK im Rahmen des Studieninformationstages am 13. Februar 2021. Zusätzlich findet am 23. Februar um 14 Uhr ein Termin speziell für englischsprachige Studieninteressierte statt.

Katja Pilipenko

Katja Pilipenko

Semestereröffnung und Hiscox-Preisverleihung 2020

Am Abend des 4. Novembers feierte die HFBK die Eröffnung des akademischen Jahres 2020/21 sowie die Verleihung des Hiscox-Kunstpreises im Livestream – offline mit genug Abstand und dennoch gemeinsam online.

Ausstellung Transparencies mit Arbeiten von Elena Crijnen, Annika Faescke, Svenja Frank, Francis Kussatz, Anne Meerpohl, Elisa Nessler, Julia Nordholz, Florentine Pahl, Cristina Rüesch, Janka Schubert, Wiebke Schwarzhans, Rosa Thiemer, Lea van Hall. Betreut von Prof. Verena Issel und Fabian Hesse; Foto: Screenshot

Ausstellung Transparencies mit Arbeiten von Elena Crijnen, Annika Faescke, Svenja Frank, Francis Kussatz, Anne Meerpohl, Elisa Nessler, Julia Nordholz, Florentine Pahl, Cristina Rüesch, Janka Schubert, Wiebke Schwarzhans, Rosa Thiemer, Lea van Hall. Betreut von Prof. Verena Issel und Fabian Hesse; Foto: Screenshot

Digitale Lehre an der HFBK

Wie die Hochschule die Besonderheiten der künstlerischen Lehre mit den Möglichkeiten des Digitalen verbindet.

Alltagsrealität oder Klischee?; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Alltagsrealität oder Klischee?; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Absolvent*innenstudie der HFBK

Kunst studieren – und was kommt danach? Die Klischeebilder halten sich standhaft: Wer Kunst studiert hat, wird entweder Taxifahrer, arbeitet in einer Bar oder heiratet reich. Aber wirklich von der Kunst leben könnten nur die wenigsten – erst Recht in Zeiten globaler Krisen. Die HFBK Hamburg wollte es genauer wissen und hat bei der Fakultät der Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften der Universität Hamburg eine breit angelegte Befragung ihrer Absolventinnen und Absolventen der letzten 15 Jahre in Auftrag gegeben.

Ausstellung Social Design, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg, Teilansicht; Foto: MKG Hamburg

Ausstellung Social Design, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg, Teilansicht; Foto: MKG Hamburg

Wie politisch ist Social Design?

Social Design, so der oft formulierte eigene Anspruch, will gesellschaftliche Missstände thematisieren und im Idealfall verändern. Deshalb versteht es sich als gesellschaftskritisch – und optimiert gleichzeitig das Bestehende. Was also ist die politische Dimension von Social Design – ist es Motor zur Veränderung oder trägt es zur Stabilisierung und Normalisierung bestehender Ungerechtigkeiten bei?