de en

Artist, Activist, Curator

One of the initiators of the exhibition Foreign Students of the HBK in 1973 was the South African student Gavin Jantjes, who, with A South African Colouring Book, created a decidedly political work during his time in Hamburg. Dr. Astrid Mania writing about the former student of the HFBK Hamburg.

Roughly two years ago, my friend and colleague Bea de Souza approached me about a conference on artistic exchanges between African and German-speaking countries she was involved in preparing. Would I be able to contribute with some research on South-African born Gavin Jantjes and his time at HFBK?[1] Jantjes, a renowned artist, activist, lecturer, and curator is, I dare to say, nonetheless not on the first-spring-to-mind-list when it comes to our former students. And this, even though he was involved in organizing one of HFBK’s first exhibitions of international students, participating with what is possibly his most famous work to date, a product of his Hamburg years.

The information is all there. Upon my inquiry, Julia Mummenhoff immediately produced from the archive the 1973 catalogue Ausländische Studenten der HBK (as HFBK was abbreviated back then). It accompanied the exhibition with its 23 international participants who, from June 5–15, had shown their works in the assembly hall. It had been initiated by HFBK’s then director Herbert von Buttlar who had called on Jantjes for help.[2] As far as Jantjes recalls, the show had a political agenda as foreign students apparently had been on the brink of losing their entitlement to benefit from the West-German state scholarship system (BAfög). Von Buttlar had intended to make a point about their importance for HFBK and beyond. But the show might also have been a demonstration of the academy’s efforts to respond to pressure from both the student body and teaching staff to create a more diverse institution.[3]

But what had motivated international students to move to Hamburg back in the 1970s? Jantjes, born in Cape Town in 1948, had been wanting to escape the dehumanizing politics to which the South African Apartheid regime had been subjecting its non-white population. A student of graphic design at the Michaelis School of Fine Art, a section of the University of Cape Town, since 1966, Jantjes relates that, possibly owing to his appointment as student representative and his involvement in protests against the university’s racist politics of appointment, he was threatened to lose the then necessary permission to study at a white institution.[4] The encounter with HFBK Hamburg student Barbara Luithard[5] who at that time also studied at Michaelis School of Fine Art led to her writing to her Hamburg professor, Hans Michel, who forwarded her message to von Buttlar. The latter offered Jantjes a place at HFBK Hamburg under the condition that he would secure himself a DAAD grant, which Jantjes, with von Buttlar’s support, successfully did.[6] In the winter semester 1970/71, he enrolled as a student in HFBK’s graphic design and visual arts departments.

A few years later, in 1974, Gavin Jantjes was granted political asylum in West Germany, after some serious and troubling difficulties he had experienced regarding his residence status. Altogether it seems that Hamburg wasn’t the safe haven he had been hoping for. His artistic statement in the 1973 catalogue is very telling in that respect: “My work is an expression of my problems. The situation I am currently facing—Germany—is not so much different from the one I left behind—South Africa. Both bear the same racist traits, and every day, I am confronted with racial prejudice, racial hatred, and racist curiosity. I am presenting some parts of an unfinished graphic design project (I don’t have any money to complete it). I am calling it ‘colouring book.’ It consists of maps, sheets, objects, and games that convey information on people and things that, because of their color or their association with a particular color, are categorized / discriminated against.” (translation A.M.)

The work in question, now known as A South African Colouring Book, however, would retain what Jantjes referred to as its unfinished state. Apparently, he had planned to expand his acerbic didactics—the book strongly draws from the look of children’s educational tools—on racist politics and the subjugation of humans and land by white colonizers to create an artist book that would have included collages commenting on the struggles of America’s First Nations and the American Civil Rights movement.[7] There are, however, individual works dealing with these topics.[8] The Colouring Book’s twelve prints, though, all bearing individual titles and based on collaged photographs, newspaper clippings, drawings, and handwritten text, focus on the Apartheid regime’s institutionalized racism. The prints are arranged in a sequence along the notions of racial categorization, identity, labor, and state violence, exemplified via legislative texts, legal documents, and portraits of the country’s political leaders. Economic data and photographs depicting the inhumane working conditions of the mostly Black laborers, documents that speak of the segregation of people and public space, and press images detailing state violence against South Africa’s Black population provided further visual material for the work. All of this is interlaced with bitter personal comments by Jantjes himself and the odd Frantz Fanon quote. Some of the images Jantjes employed in this project were sourced from Ernest Cole’s photography book House of Bondage (1968), others from visuals by press photographers Peter Magubane and Sam Nzima.[9] According to Allison K. Young, in preparing for his project, Jantjes had travelled to London to browse the archives of the African National Congress headquarters and the office of the International Defense and Aid Fund.[10] Young also contends that the work was, at least to a certain extent, made in response to conversations Jantjes had with fellow students at HFBK Hamburg who didn’t seem to grasp the hopelessness of the situation of Black South Africans in the face of Apartheid.[11]

Jantjes’ Hamburg professors certainly also had a strong influence on the Colouring Book. Amna Malik in her essay on the work explicitly mentions Joe Tilson, who was a guest lecturer at HFBK Hamburg in 1971/72.[12] The parallels between Jantjes’ series and Tilson’s 1970 book project “Pages” with its combination of printed and hand-written text, complete with press images ranging from advertisements to portraits of civil rights and Black Power leaders, its superimposition of images or their Warhol-like repetition are certainly striking. According to Young, Joseph Beuys, guest professor at HFBK Hamburg for the winter term 1974/75, later invited Jantjes to participate in the Free International University exhibition at Documenta 6 in 1977 where Jantjes displayed the Colouring Book in a gallery adjacent to Honigpumpe am Arbeitsplatz.[13]

In 1970s South Africa, Jantjes’ work was banned. Especially in recent years though, with many a Western museums’ efforts to diversify, the Colouring Book has been included in a number of major museum collections, among them London’s Tate, which bought the work in 2002, and New York’s Museum of Modern Art, describing the book as a “recent acquisition.” One copy can also be found in Washington’s National Museum of African Art. Two editions went on sale at Sotheby’s 2020 online “Modern and Contemporary African Art” auction with an estimate of between 40,000 and 60,000 GBP.[14]

Today, Gavin Jantjes divides his time between Cape Town, England, and Oslo. Following his studies, he functioned as a graphic designer for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees before moving to Wiltshire, England, in 1982. He worked both in academia and was a member of various museum boards in London, until he was appointed artistic director of the Henie Onstad Kunstsenter near Oslo. From 2004 – 2014, he was Senior Consultant for International Contemporary Exhibitions at Oslo’s National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design. His artistic and political agenda hasn’t changed since 1973. In many of his subsequent artworks and also in his writing, Jantjes has alertly criticized racist structures and the instrumentalization or exploitation of non-Western cultures by white artists and curators.[15]


Dr. Astrid Mania is Professor of Art Criticism and Modern Art History at HFBK Hamburg.

Notes

[1] The author: “Narratives on Gavin Jantjes. His DAAD years at the Hochschule für Bildende Künste Hamburg 1970-72.” Online lecture (unpublished) in the context of the “Looking Back, Looking Forward. Artistic Itineraries Across African and German-speaking Countries in the 1950s to 1970s” symposium at Kunsthistorisches Institut der Universität Zürich, December 16/17, 2021.

I would like to thank Gavin Jantjes for his generosity in sharing his recollections with me in preparation for the lecture. Unfortunately, he was not available for an interview for Lerchenfeld, so this essay comes in lieu of a conversation. I have not quoted from any of the emails Gavin Jantjes sent me in late 2021, but I have been drawing information from them and have tried to do so in the most respectful manner.

[2] Who took up the challenge, together with Argentinian-born fellow-student Luis Siquot. Gavin Jantjes in an email to the author, Dec 1, 2021.

[3] ibid.

[4] Gavin Jantjes in an email to the author, September 4, 2021.

[5] Barbara Luithard, accompanied by her husband and former HFBK Hamburg graphic design student Rudolf Luithard, had spent some years in South Africa where she had also studied at the Michaelis School of Fine Art’s design department before resuming her education at HFBK Hamburg.

[6] Gavin Jantjes in an email to the author, September 4, 2021.

I have not been able to retrieve any information from DAAD as to whether there may have been any special support for academics who were victims of the Apartheid regime. On a broader political scope, the West German government under Willy Brandt maintained close economic relations with the Apartheid regime.

[7] Gavin Jantjes in an email to the author, Dec 1, 2021.

A South African Colouring Book comes in an edition of 20. The sheets are kept in a black folder that has on its cover the work’s title and the emblematic, stylized color palette that recurs on every print. They each measure 60.2 x 45.2 cm.

[8] For instance, The First Real Amerikan Target (1974, color lithograph with collage, 59 x 44 cm) with its portraits of First Nation leaders shown above a colorful target, a sarcastic appropriation of Jasper Johns’ Target with Four Faces (1955).

[9] Allison K. Young. “Visualizing Apartheid Abroad: Gavin Jantjes’s Screenprints of the 1970s.” Art Journal. Vol 76, Fall-Winter 2017, pp. 10 – 31, 15.

[10] Ibid., p. 14. This is in line with Jantjes’ description of the work for the Sotheby’s 2020 online sale Modern and Contemporary African Art catalogue (June 4, 2023).

[11] Young, op. cit., p. 14. In the 1973 catalogue, Jantjes is first among the students who introduce themselves as “Gruppe ‘Black Students’,” calling on the visitors to benefit from the opportunity to meet the group and listen to their problems.

[12] Amna Malik. “Gavin Jantjes’s A South African Colouring Book.” Nick Aikens and Elizabeth Robles The Place is Here, The Work of Black Artists in 1980s Britain, ed. Berlin: Sternberg Press 2019, pp. 161 – 190, 182.

[13] According to Young, “Jantjes sat in the gallery, speaking with visitors and giving impromptu lectures about his work.” Young, op. cit., p. 18.

[14] Unfortunately, the results are not disclosed. However, under lot 79, Sotheby’s publishes the above-mentioned description of the work by Jantjes himself, even though the date of the work’s display at HFBK is erroneously stated as 1974. See fn. 9.

[15] See, for instance, his doubtful remarks on the 1989 exhibition Magiciens de la terre with its self-proclaimed equality between all participating artists, regardless of their background: Gavin Jantjes. “Red Rags to the Bull.” Rasheed Araeen (ed.). The Other Story: Afro-Asian Artists in Post-War Britain (exhibition catalogue), London: Hayward Gallery, 1989, unpaginated.

This article appeared in Lerchenfeld issue #67.

Begutachtung der eingereichten Mappen durch die Aufnahmekommission

How to apply: Studium an der HFBK Hamburg

Vom 1. Februar bis 5. März 2024, 16 Uhr läuft die Bewerbungsfrist für ein Studium an der HFBK Hamburg. Alle wichtigen Infos dazu gibt es hier.

Sieben Personen stehen vor einer bunten Wand aus unterschiedlich farbigen Stoffstreifen.

Besucher*innen der Jahresausstellung 2024; Foto: Lukes Engelhardt

Jahresausstellung 2024 an der HFBK Hamburg

Vom 9. - 11. Februar 2024 (jeweils 14 - 20 Uhr) präsentieren die Studierenden der HFBK Hamburg ihre künstlerischen Produktionen des letzten Jahres. Im ICAT ist neben der von Nadine Droste kuratierten Gruppenausstellung »Think & Feel! Speak & Act!« mit Arbeiten von Master-Studierenden auch die Präsentation der Austauschstudierenden des Goldsmiths, University of London, zu sehen.

In der linken Bildhälfte wird ein Übermensch großes Objekt gezeigt. Ein aus Metall bestehender Kubus mit unterschiedlichen Objekten darin. Dahinter kann man vier Leinwände, die ein hochkantiges Format aufweisen, erahnen. An der rechten Wand steht eine Tischvitrine und an der Wand sind zwei großformatige Blätter angebracht.

Ausstellungsansicht des Hiscox Kunstpreises 2023; Foto: Tim Albrecht

(Ex)Changes of / in Art

Zum Jahresende ist an der HFBK Hamburg viel los: Ausstellungen im ICAT, die Open Studios der ASA-Studierenden in der Karolinenstraße, Performances in der Extended Library und Vorträge in der Aula Wartenau.

Extended Libraries

Wissen ist heute von überall und zeitunabhängig abrufbar. Welche Rolle(n) können dann noch Bibliotheken übernehmen? Wie können sie nicht nur als Wissensarchiv dienen, sondern die künstlerische Wissensproduktion unterstützen? Beispielhaft stellen wir Bibliotheksprojekte von Studierenden und Alumni sowie unseren neuen Wissensraum vor: die Extended Library.

Semestereröffnung 2023/24

Wir begrüßen die zahlreichen neuen Studierenden zum akademischen Jahr 2023/24 an der HFBK Hamburg. Ein herzliches Willkommen gilt auch den neuen Professor*innen, die wir Ihnen hier vorstellen möchten.

Auf einer Wand wurden Buchseiten mit Malereien und Zeichnungen in unterschiedlichen Formaten angebracht. Außerdem sind zwei Buchumschläge des Buches "Die Völker der Erde" zusehen.

Detailansicht Rajkamal Kahlon, People of the Earth (Die Völker der Erde), 2017 - 2021

And Still I Rise

Seit über 20 Jahren gilt das Interesse der US-amerikanischen Künstlerin Rajkamal Kahlon den Zusammenhängen von Ästhetik und Macht, die über historische und geografische Grenzen hinweg vornehmlich durch Gewalt organisiert sind. Mit dieser Einzelausstellung stellt die HFBK Hamburg das vielseitige Werk der Professorin für Malerei und Zeichnen erstmals dem Hamburger Kunstpublikum vor.

Eine Person steht an einem Mischpult auf der Bühne der Aula. Hinter ihr laufen bunte nonfigurative Bilder auf einer großen Leinwand. Im Vordergrund der Szene liegen die Besuchenden auf dem Boden, gebettet auf Kissen. Ein helles Licht strahlt aus der linken oberen Ecke in die Kamera.

Festival "Klassentreffen" von Prof. Michaela Melián, Konzert von Nika Son; Foto: Lukes Engelhardt

No Tracking. No Paywall.

Just Premium Content! Der (fehlende) Sommer bietet die ideale Gelegenheit, um Versäumtes nachzuholen. In der Mediathek der HFBK Hamburg lassen uns Lehrende, Studierende und Alumni an Wissen und Diskussionen teilhaben – an emotionalen Momenten und kontroversen Diskursen. Durch Podcasts und Videos bringen sie sich in aktuelle Debatten ein und behandeln wichtige Themen, die gerade im Fokus stehen.

Let's talk about language

An der HFBK Hamburg studieren aktuell ca. 350 internationale Studierende, die 55 unterschiedliche Sprachen sprechen – zumindest sind das die offiziellen Amtssprachen ihrer Herkunftsländer. Ein Viertel der Lehrenden hat einen internationalen Hintergrund. Tendenz steigend. Aber wie gehen wir im Alltag mit der Vielsprachigkeit der Hochschulmitglieder produktiv um? Welche Wege der Verständigung lassen sich finden? Die aktuelle Lerchenfeld-Ausgabe beschäftigt sich mit kreativen Lösungen im Umgang mit Mehrsprachigkeit und lässt zahlreiche ehemalige internationale Studierende zu Wort kommen.

In der Eingangshalle der HFBK steht eine Holzbude mit dem hinterleuchteten Schriftzug "Würstelinsel". Davor stehen ein paar Leute.

Hanna Naske, Würstelinsel, 2023, Installation in der Eingangshalle der HFBK Hamburg; Foto: Miriam Schmidt / HFBK

Graduate Show 2023: Unfinished Business

Vom 13. bis 16. Juli 2023 präsentieren 165 Bachelor- und Master-Absolvent*innen des Jahrgangs 2022/23 ihre Abschlussarbeiten aus allen Studienschwerpunkten. Unter dem Titel Final Cut laufen zudem alle Abschlussfilme auf großer Leinwand in der Aula der HFBK Hamburg.

Zwischen blauen Frühlingsblumen hindurch ist der Haupteingang der HFBK Hamburg mit seinem Portal zu erkennen.

Der Eingang der HFBK Hamburg im Frühling; Foto: Ronja Lotz

Alles für alle

Im Mai und Juni bietet die HFBK Hamburg ein abwechslungsreiches Programm mit Ausstellungen, Vorträgen, Künstler*innengesprächen und Performances. Viele gute Gründe, die Frühjahrsmüdigkeit abzuschütteln und sich in das Programm zu stürzen...

Ein verkleideter Mann mit Sonnenbrille hält ein Schild in Sternform in die Kamera. Darauf steht "Suckle". Das Bild ist in Schwarz-Weiß aufgenommen.

Foto: Honey-Suckle Company

Let`s work together

Kollektive haben Konjunktur im Kunstbetrieb. Und das schon seit mehreren Jahrzehnten. Zum Start des Sommersemesters 2023 widmet sich die aktuelle Ausgabe des Lerchenfeld-Magazins dem Thema der kollektiven Praxis, stellt ausgewählte Kollektive vor und geht aber auch den Gefahren und Problemen kollektiven Arbeitens nach.

Jahresausstellung 2023, Arbeit von Toni Mosebach / Nora Strömer; Foto: Lukes Engelhardt

Jahresausstellung 2023 an der HFBK Hamburg

Vom 10.-12. Februar präsentieren Studierende aus allen Schwerpunkten ihre künstlerischen Arbeiten im Gebäude am Lerchenfeld, in der Wartenau 15 und im AtelierHaus. Im dort ansässigen ICAT kuratiert Tobias Peper, Künstlerischer Leiter des Kunstvereins Harburger Bahnhof, eine Ausstellung mit HFBK-Masterstudierenden. Zudem stellen dort 10 Austauschstudierende des Goldsmiths, University of London ihre Arbeiten aus.

Symposium: Kontroverse documenta fifteen

Mit dem Symposium zur documenta fifteen am 1. und 2. Februar 2023 möchte die HFBK Hamburg Hintergründe und Zusammenhänge analysieren, unterschiedliche Standpunkte ins Gespräch bringen und eine Debatte ermöglichen, die explizit den Antisemitismus im Kunstfeld thematisiert. Die Veranstaltung bietet Raum für divergente Positionen und will Perspektiven für die Gegenwart und Zukunft des Ausstellungmachens eröffnen.

ASA Open Studios im Wintersemester 2021/22; Foto: Marie-Theres Böhmker

ASA Open Studios im Wintersemester 2021/22; Foto: Marie-Theres Böhmker

Das Beste kommt zum Schluss

Zum Jahresende finden nochmals zahlreiche Ausstellungen und Veranstaltungen mit HFBK-Kontext statt. Einige davon tragen wir hier zusammen. Auch einen kurzen Ausblick auf zwei Vorträge im Rahmen des Professionalisierungsprogramms im Januar finden sich in darunter.

Non-Knowledge, Laughter and the Moving Image, Grafik: Leon Lothschütz

Non-Knowledge, Laughter and the Moving Image, Grafik: Leon Lothschütz

Festival und Symposium: Non-Knowledge, Laughter and the Moving Image

Als abschließender Teil des künstlerischen Forschungsprojekts laden das Festival und Symposium vom 24.-27. November 2022 zu Vorführungen, Performances, Vorträgen und Diskussionen ein, die das Potenzial der bewegten Bilder und des (menschlichen und nicht-menschlichen) Körpers erforschen, unseren gewohnten Kurs umzukehren und die herrschende Ordnung der Dinge zu verändern.

Blick in die vollbesetzte Aula zum Semesterstart; Foto: Lukas Engelhardt

Blick in die vollbesetzte Aula zum Semesterstart; Foto: Lukas Engelhardt

Herzlich willkommen - und los geht's!

Wir freuen uns, zum Wintersemester 2022/23 viele neue Gesichter an der HFBK Hamburg begrüßen zu können. Einige Informationen und Hintergründe zu unseren neuen Professor*innen und Gastprofessor*innen stellen wir hier zusammen.

Einzelausstellung von Konstantin Grcic

Vom 29. September bis 23. Oktober 2022 zeigt Konstantin Grcic (Professor für Industriedesign) im ICAT - Institute for Contemporary Art & Transfer der HFBK Hamburg eine raumgreifende Installation aus von ihm gestalteten Objekten und bereits existierenden, neu zusammengestellten Gegenständen. Parallel wird der von ihm konzipierte Raum für Workshops, Seminare und Büro-Arbeitsplätze im AtelierHaus in Betrieb genommen.

Amna Elhassan, Tea Lady, Öl auf Leinwand, 100 x 100 cm

Amna Elhassan, Tea Lady, Öl auf Leinwand, 100 x 100 cm

Kunst und Krieg

„Jeder Künstler ist ein Mensch“. Diese so zutreffende wie existenzialistische Feststellung von Martin Kippenberger (in ironischer Umformulierung des bekannten Beuys Zitats) bringt es in vielerlei Hinsicht auf den Punkt. Zum einen erinnert sie uns daran, nicht wegzusehen, (künstlerisch) aktiv zu handeln und unsere Stimmen zu erheben. Gleichzeitig ist sie eine Ermahnung, denen zu helfen, die in Not sind. Und das sind im Moment sehr viele Menschen, unter ihnen zahlreiche Künstler*innen. Deshalb ist es für Kunstinstitutionen wichtig, nicht nur über Kunst, sondern auch über Politik zu diskutieren.

Merlin Reichert, Die Alltäglichkeit des Untergangs, Installation in der Galerie der HFBK; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Graduate Show 2022: We’ve Only Just Begun

Vom 8. bis 10. Juli 2022 präsentieren mehr als 160 Bachelor- und Master-Absolvent*innen des Jahrgangs 2021/22 ihre Abschlussarbeiten aus allen Studienschwerpunkten. Unter dem Titel Final Cut laufen zudem alle Abschlussfilme auf großer Leinwand in der Aula der HFBK Hamburg. Parallel ist in der Galerie der HFBK im Atelierhaus die Ausstellung der sudanesischen Gastlektorin Amna Elhassan zu sehen.

Grafik: Nele Willert, Dennise Salinas

Grafik: Nele Willert, Dennise Salinas

Der Juni lockt mit Kunst und Theorie

So viel Programm war schon lange nicht mehr: Ein dreitägiger Kongress zur Visualität des Internets bringt internationale Webdesigner*innen zusammen; das Forscher*innenkollektiv freethought diskutiert über die Rolle von Infrastrukturen und das Symposium zum Abschied der Professorin Michaela Ott greift zentrale Fragen ihrer Forschungstätigkeit auf.

Renée Green. ED/HF, 2017. Film still. Courtesy of the artist, Free Agent Media, Bortolami Gallery, New York, and Galerie Nagel Draxler, Berlin/Cologne/Munich.

Renée Green. ED/HF, 2017. Film still. Courtesy of the artist, Free Agent Media, Bortolami Gallery, New York, and Galerie Nagel Draxler, Berlin/Cologne/Munich.

Finkenwerder Kunstpreis 2022

Der 1999 vom Kulturkreis Finkenwerder e.V. initiierte Finkenwerder Kunstpreis hat eine Neuausrichtung erfahren: Als neuer Partner erweitert die HFBK Hamburg den Preis um den Aspekt der künstlerischen Nachwuchsförderung und richtet ab 2022 die Ausstellung der Prämierten in der HFBK Galerie aus. Mit dem diesjährigen Finkenwerder Kunstpreis wird die US-amerikanische Künstlein Renée Green ausgezeichnet. Die HFBK-Absolventin Frieda Toranzo Jaeger erhält den Finkenwerder Förderpreis der HFBK Hamburg.

Amanda F. Koch-Nielsen, Motherslugger; Foto: Lukas Engelhardt

Amanda F. Koch-Nielsen, Motherslugger; Foto: Lukas Engelhardt

Nachhaltigkeit im Kontext von Kunst und Kunsthochschule

Im Bewusstsein einer ausstehenden fundamentalen gesellschaftlichen Transformation und der nicht unwesentlichen Schrittmacherfunktion, die einem Ort der künstlerischen Forschung und Produktion hierbei womöglich zukommt, hat sich die HFBK Hamburg auf den Weg gemacht, das Thema strategisch wie konkret pragmatisch für die Hochschule zu entwickeln. Denn wer, wenn nicht die Künstler*innen sind in ihrer täglichen Arbeit damit befasst, das Gegebene zu hinterfragen, genau hinzuschauen, neue Möglichkeiten, wie die Welt sein könnte, zu erkennen und durchzuspielen, einem anderen Wissen Gestalt zu geben

Atelier-Neubau in der Häuserflucht am Lerchenfeld

Atelier-Neubau in der Häuserflucht am Lerchenfeld, im Hintergrund der Bau von Fritz Schumacher; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Raum für die Kunst

Nach mehr als 40 Jahren intensiven Bemühens wird für die HFBK Hamburg ein lang gehegter Traum Wirklichkeit. Mit dem neu eröffneten Ateliergebäude erhalten die Studienschwerpunkte Malerei/Zeichnen, Bildhauerei und Zeitbezogene Medien endlich die dringend benötigten Atelierräume für Master-Studierende. Es braucht einfach Raum für eigene Ideen, zum Denken, für Kunstproduktion, Ausstellungen und als Depot.

Martha Szymkowiak / Emilia Bongilaj, Installation “Mmh”; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Martha Szymkowiak / Emilia Bongilaj, Installation “Mmh”; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Jahresausstellung 2022 an der HFBK Hamburg

Nach der digitalen Ausgabe im letzten Jahr, findet die Jahresausstellung 2022 an der HFBK Hamburg wieder mit Publikum statt. Vom 11.-13. Februar präsentieren die Studierenden aus allen Studienschwerpunkten ihre künstlerischen Arbeiten im Gebäude am Lerchenfeld, in der Wartenau 15 und im neu eröffneten Atelierhaus.

Annette Wehrmann, photography from the series Blumensprengungen, 1991-95; Foto: Ort des Gegen e.V., VG-Bild Kunst Bonn

Annette Wehrmann, photography from the series Blumensprengungen, 1991-95; Foto: Ort des Gegen e.V., VG-Bild Kunst Bonn

Conference: Counter-Monuments and Para-Monuments

The international conference at HFBK Hamburg on December 2-4, 2021 – jointly conceived by Nora Sternfeld and Michaela Melián –, is dedicated to the history of artistic counter-monuments and forms of protest, discusses aesthetics of memory and historical manifestations in public space, and asks about para-monuments for the present.

23 Fragen des Institutional Questionaire, grafisch umgesetzt von Ran Altamirano auf den Türgläsern der HFBK Hamburg zur Jahresausstellung 2021; Foto: Charlotte Spiegelfeld

23 Fragen des Institutional Questionaire, grafisch umgesetzt von Ran Altamirano auf den Türgläsern der HFBK Hamburg zur Jahresausstellung 2021; Foto: Charlotte Spiegelfeld

Diversity

Wer spricht? Wer malt welches Motiv? Wer wird gezeigt, wer nicht? Identitätspolitische Fragen spielen in der Kunst und damit auch an der HFBK Hamburg eine wichtige Rolle. Das hochschuleigene Lerchenfeld-Magazin beleuchtet in der aktuellen Ausgabe Hochschulstrukturen sowie Studierendeninitiativen, die sich mit Diversität und Identität befassen.

Foto: Klaus Frahm

Foto: Klaus Frahm

Summer Break

Die HFBK Hamburg befindet sich in der vorlesungsfreien Zeit, viele Studierende und Lehrende sind im Sommerurlaub, Kunstinstitutionen haben Sommerpause. Eine gute Gelegenheit zum vielfältigen Nach-Lesen und -Sehen:

ASA Open Studio 2019, Karolinenstraße 2a, Haus 5; Foto: Matthew Muir

ASA Open Studio 2019, Karolinenstraße 2a, Haus 5; Foto: Matthew Muir

Live und in Farbe: die ASA Open Studios im Juni 2021

Seit 2010 organisiert die HFBK das internationale Austauschprogramm Art School Alliance. Es ermöglicht HFBK-Studierenden ein Auslandssemester an renommierten Partnerhochschulen und lädt vice versa internationale Kunststudierende an die HFBK ein. Zum Ende ihres Hamburg-Aufenthalts stellen die Studierenden in den Open Studios in der Karolinenstraße aus, die nun auch wieder für das kunstinteressierte Publikum geöffnet sind.

Studiengruppe Prof. Dr. Anja Steidinger, Was animiert uns?, 2021, Mediathek der HFBK Hamburg, Filmstill

Studiengruppe Prof. Dr. Anja Steidinger, Was animiert uns?, 2021, Mediathek der HFBK Hamburg, Filmstill

Vermitteln und Verlernen: Wartenau Versammlungen

Die Kunstpädagogik Professorinnen Nora Sternfeld und Anja Steidinger haben das Format „Wartenau Versammlungen“ initiiert. Es oszilliert zwischen Kunst, Bildung, Forschung und Aktivismus. Ergänzend zu diesem offenen Handlungsraum gibt es nun auch eine eigene Website, die die Diskurse, Gespräche und Veranstaltungen begleitet.

Ausstellungsansicht "Schule der Folgenlosigkeit. Übungen für ein anderes Leben" im Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg; Foto: Maximilian Schwarzmann

Ausstellungsansicht "Schule der Folgenlosigkeit. Übungen für ein anderes Leben" im Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg; Foto: Maximilian Schwarzmann

Schule der Folgenlosigkeit

Alle reden über Folgen: Die Folgen des Klimawandels, der Corona-Pandemie oder der Digitalisierung. Friedrich von Borries (Professor für Designtheorie) dagegen widmet sich der Folgenlosigkeit. In der "Schule der Folgenlosigkeit. Übungen für ein anderes Leben" im Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg verknüpft er Sammlungsobjekte mit einem eigens für die Ausstellung eingerichteten „Selbstlernraum“ so, dass eine neue Perspektive auf „Nachhaltigkeit“ entsteht und vermeintlich allgemeingültige Vorstellungen eines „richtigen Lebens“ hinterfragt werden.

Jahresausstellung 2021 der HFBK Hamburg

Jahresausstellung einmal anders: Vom 12.-14. Februar 2021 hatten die Studierenden der Hochschule für bildende Künste Hamburg dafür gemeinsam mit ihren Professor*innen eine Vielzahl von Präsentationsmöglichkeiten auf unterschiedlichen Kommunikationskanälen erschlossen. Die Formate reichten von gestreamten Live-Performances über Videoprogramme, Radiosendungen, eine Telefonhotline, Online-Konferenzen bis hin zu einem Webshop für Editionen. Darüber hinaus waren vereinzelte Interventionen im Außenraum der HFBK und in der Stadt zu entdecken.

Katja Pilipenko

Katja Pilipenko

Semestereröffnung und Hiscox-Preisverleihung 2020

Am Abend des 4. Novembers feierte die HFBK die Eröffnung des akademischen Jahres 2020/21 sowie die Verleihung des Hiscox-Kunstpreises im Livestream – offline mit genug Abstand und dennoch gemeinsam online.

Ausstellung Transparencies mit Arbeiten von Elena Crijnen, Annika Faescke, Svenja Frank, Francis Kussatz, Anne Meerpohl, Elisa Nessler, Julia Nordholz, Florentine Pahl, Cristina Rüesch, Janka Schubert, Wiebke Schwarzhans, Rosa Thiemer, Lea van Hall. Betreut von Prof. Verena Issel und Fabian Hesse; Foto: Screenshot

Ausstellung Transparencies mit Arbeiten von Elena Crijnen, Annika Faescke, Svenja Frank, Francis Kussatz, Anne Meerpohl, Elisa Nessler, Julia Nordholz, Florentine Pahl, Cristina Rüesch, Janka Schubert, Wiebke Schwarzhans, Rosa Thiemer, Lea van Hall. Betreut von Prof. Verena Issel und Fabian Hesse; Foto: Screenshot

Digitale Lehre an der HFBK

Wie die Hochschule die Besonderheiten der künstlerischen Lehre mit den Möglichkeiten des Digitalen verbindet.

Alltagsrealität oder Klischee?; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Alltagsrealität oder Klischee?; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Absolvent*innenstudie der HFBK

Kunst studieren – und was kommt danach? Die Klischeebilder halten sich standhaft: Wer Kunst studiert hat, wird entweder Taxifahrer, arbeitet in einer Bar oder heiratet reich. Aber wirklich von der Kunst leben könnten nur die wenigsten – erst Recht in Zeiten globaler Krisen. Die HFBK Hamburg wollte es genauer wissen und hat bei der Fakultät der Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften der Universität Hamburg eine breit angelegte Befragung ihrer Absolventinnen und Absolventen der letzten 15 Jahre in Auftrag gegeben.

Ausstellung Social Design, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg, Teilansicht; Foto: MKG Hamburg

Ausstellung Social Design, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg, Teilansicht; Foto: MKG Hamburg

Wie politisch ist Social Design?

Social Design, so der oft formulierte eigene Anspruch, will gesellschaftliche Missstände thematisieren und im Idealfall verändern. Deshalb versteht es sich als gesellschaftskritisch – und optimiert gleichzeitig das Bestehende. Was also ist die politische Dimension von Social Design – ist es Motor zur Veränderung oder trägt es zur Stabilisierung und Normalisierung bestehender Ungerechtigkeiten bei?